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Campaigns

Every year, the Labour Inspectorate organises various prevention, awareness-raising and inspection campaigns. Read more about the campaigns we have launched in recent years below.

Campaigns of the Labour Inspectorate

Although subcontracting certain enterprises for specific technical tasks is a common phenomenon, the EFBWW claims that it often involves exploitation, misrepresentation and the abuse of labour, especially in cross-border contexts. Subcontracting chains are frequently used to conceal employment relationships, and to evade social security charges or other taxes, joint and several liability and inspections of the Labour Inspectorate.

The primary issues that the EFBWW points out are short deadlines and the pressure exerted on subcontractors by clients and main contractors to cut corners. This can often be the reason why subcontractors do not pay the remuneration stipulated under the collective bargaining agreement or minimum wage and ignore the requirements of overtime work, occupational health and safety, accommodation and transportation. In addition, subcontractors frequently vanish after months of work without paying their workers. These enterprises are often employment mediation agencies and shell companies that do not engage in actual and productive business. Mobile workers from other European Union countries and increasingly from third countries are frequently victims of undeclared and underdeclared work, fake postings and social security fraud. Instead of salaried workers, they are unknowingly declared as micro-enterprises in order to disguise the real dependency between workers and employers.

According to the EFBWW, a potential solution could be, among other things, to limit subcontracting chains to a maximum of one or two sub-layers for both public and private procurement contracts. Namely, the longer the subcontracting chain, the less transparent it is and the more difficult it is to control it and enforce existing legislation and collective agreements. The EFBWW also considers it necessary to impose stricter rules for public procurements. They call for binding legislation to ensure that only companies (including all subcontractors) which engage in collective bargaining and pay wages according to the most favourable collective agreements can win public contracts. The EFBWW believes that due diligence escape clauses should be prohibited and that Member States should introduce joint and several liability so that clients and the main contractors would always be liable for the actions of subcontractors. This would encourage enterprises to avoid engaging with shell companies and shady employment mediation providers.  

Additionally, the EFBWW and the European Construction Industry Federation, their social partner which represents employers, call for effective European digital enforcement tools, which would make cross-border subcontracting chains as fraud-proof as possible. A European Social Security Number (ESSN) or a European Social Security Pass (ESSP) should enable real-time cross-border access to data. It is also necessary to strengthen the right of trade union and workers’ representatives to monitor and enforce the rights of workers in subcontracting chains by providing them with full access to information regarding the subcontracting and by granting them the right to visit and audit worksites without prior notification. The EFBWW also believes that European and national legislation should ensure equal treatment in both public and private procurements so that subcontractors provide their workers the same working conditions and social security rights as the main contractor. Direct employment should be the norm, so that full equal treatment applies to subcontracted workers as well – equal pay for equal work.

The Labour Inspectorate hereby encourages you to contribute to raising awareness of matters regarding subcontracting and implementing changes that ensure fair competition and workers’ rights in construction. You, too, can make proposals to the European Commission on the official website of the European Union in order to improve EU legislation. The European Commission, in turn, will make legal proposals to the European Parliament and the Council of the European Union based, among other things, on the opinions of citizens and stakeholders. More information about the campaign is available on the website of the European Federation of Building and Woodworkers.

In addition, you can inform the Labour Inspectorate about violations of employment legislation at [email protected].

In October and November 2021, a campaign called ‘Gateway to a Safe Working Environment’ took place, which introduced the Labour Inspectorate’s self-service platform (TEIS) iseteenindus.ti.ee.

In the spring of 2020, the Labour Inspectorate revealed the long-prepared new information system. The most important purpose of TEIS is to support employers in creating a good working environment. When an enterprise is included in the inspection sample, they exchange information with the labour inspector digitally, which makes the process faster and smoother.

In the course of the campaign, we explained the importance of a working environment risk assessment and how it can be conveniently prepared using the risk assessment tool in TEIS.

The campaign was carried out in the context of the aid eligibility criteria of the European Social Fund ‘Development of a Working Environment That Maintains and Sustains Capacity for Work 2014-2020’.

Know Your Rights – Instruction and Training

The Labour Inspectorate’s 2018 awareness-raising campaign ‘Know Your Rights – Instruction and Training’ took place from 7 September until 29 October 2018. The campaign was aimed at employees and employers.  An average of 14 occupational accidents occur in Estonia every day, a fifth of which have severe consequences. This is often caused by the employee’s lack of training and instruction, which is the second most common working environment violation. In order to remind people of the importance of instruction, the Labour Inspectorate invited enterprises and organisations to take part in an initiative in the last week of September 2018, called 

‘Contribute to Safety Immediately!’. The purpose of the call was to illustrate how instruction is organised in institutions and thus inspire others as well. At the end of September, 48 enterprises and institutions from all over Estonia joined the call of the Labour Inspectorate. The institutions that joined the ’Contribute to Safety Immediately!’ initiative carried out occupational safety training and captured it in photos or videos, which are available to everyone 

on the Tööelu Facebook page. The campaign was funded in the context of the aid eligibility criteria of the European Social Fund ‘Development of a Working Environment That Maintains and Sustains Capacity for Work 2014-2020’.

Know Your Rights – See the Hazard 2017

The purpose of the ‘Know Your Rights – See the Hazard’ campaign was to remind both employees and employers of the need to be attentive when working with machinery and to always check the condition of their equipment. Employees should always notify their employer when they notice defects or deficiencies in work equipment.

Statistics show that many accidents at work are actually caused by negligence, carelessness and absent-mindedness. People tend to forget that the work equipment manufacturer has not provided protective devices for nothing, and the machines are being arbitrarily re-adjusted or modified. This creates suitable conditions for occupational accidents. Loss of control over machinery, tools or means of transport can lead to very serious hazardous situations, resulting in an occupational accident and, in the worst cases, death.

The campaign was funded in the context of the aid eligibility criteria of the European Social Fund ‘Development of a Working Environment That Maintains and Sustains Capacity for Work 2014-2020’.

Know Your Rights – Instruction and Training 2016

In 2016, the Labour Inspectorate organised a social campaign called ‘Know Your Rights – Instruction and Training’.

The purpose of the campaign was to motivate employees and employers to pay more attention to improving occupational health and safety and for enterprises to take actual steps towards a safer and more productive working environment. 

The campaign was funded in the context of the aid eligibility criteria of the European Social Fund ‘Development of a Working Environment That Maintains and Sustains Capacity for Work 2014-2020’.

Know Your Rights – Pre-contractual Negotiations 2016

In 2016, the Labour Inspectorate organised a social campaign called ‘Know Your Rights – Pre-contractual Negotiations’.

The purpose of the campaign was to raise public awareness of the importance of pre-contractual negotiations.

The campaign was funded in the context of the aid eligibility criteria of the European Social Fund ‘Development of a Working Environment That Maintains and Sustains Capacity for Work 2014-2020’.

Healthy Workplaces for All Ages 2016-2017

In 2016-2017, the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA) organised a Europe-wide campaign ‘Healthy Workplaces for All Ages’. The EU-OSHA campaign focused on sustainable employment and extending the healthy period of life, emphasised the importance of risk prevention throughout the career and its benefits for employees, enterprises and society as a whole. The purpose of the campaign was to promote sustainable employment and healthy aging, starting from the beginning of one’s working life. This protects the health of employees before and after retirement, as well as the productivity of organisations.

The EU-OSHA campaign in Estonia was launched with a press conference on 28 April, when people celebrate the World Day for Safety and Health at Work.

Know Your Rights – Young Worker 2015

In 2015, the Labour Inspectorate organised a social campaign called ‘Know Your Rights – Young Worker’.

The purpose of the campaign was to raise youth awareness of the working environment and employment relationships in order to provide basic knowledge to those starting their working life and to reduce the number of occupational accidents involving employees with less than two years of working experience.

The campaign was aimed at young employees (age group 18+), most of whom graduated from vocational education institutions in 2015 before entering the labour market.

As part of the campaign, the Labour Inspectorate launched a media campaign, produced various informational materials and organised information events in vocational education institutions. A two-sided brochure was published:

The campaign was funded by the European Social Fund under the programme ‘Reduction of Work-related Health Risks and Improvement of Labour Relations 2010-2014’.

Healthy Workplaces Manage Stress 2014-2015

In 2014-2015, the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA) launched a Europe-wide campaign ‘Healthy Workplaces Manage Stress’, which calls on various enterprises and organisations in Europe to actively combat psychosocial risks at work. In Estonia, the campaign was coordinated by the Estonian Focal Point of the EU-OSHA along with the Labour Inspectorate.

The campaign was aimed at all employers and employees with the purpose of raising awareness of work-related stress and psychosocial risks, and to encourage employers and employees to cooperate in order to reduce these risks. In Estonia, the campaign focused on two primary issues: employment relationships and reconciling work and family life.

The campaign included a press conference, seminars in various Estonian cities, a movie night on occupational safety, a Health at Work Day, dissemination and publication of informational materials, Napo cartoons and other practical means. A competition for Good Practice Awards was held in 2014 with the aim of highlighting enterprises and organisations that are actively reducing work-related stress and psychosocial risks with the help of employees. 

Slips and Trips on the Same Level 2014

In 2014, the Senior Labour Inspectors Committee (SLIC) and representatives of EU Member States organised a campaign called ‘Slips and Trips on the Same Level’. In order to prepare and coordinate the campaign, a working group led by Estonia was formed, which included representatives of Ireland, Poland, Denmark, the United Kingdom and the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work. In Estonia, the campaign was carried out by the Labour Inspectorate.

The purpose of the campaign was to use supervision and awareness-raising activities to make employees and employers pay attention to the prevention of occupational accidents caused by slipping and tripping. The campaign was aimed at enterprises in the food processing, metals, health care, HoReCa (hotel/restaurant/catering), retail and wholesale (storage) sector.

The campaign included five information events in various Estonian cities, a press briefing, media campaign, publication of articles, preparation of educational interactive software on situations where slipping and tripping are possible and ways to prevent them, the 2015 campaign calendar and poster.

The campaign was funded by the European Social Fund under the programme ‘Reduction of Work-related Health Risks and Improvement of Labour Relations 2010-2014’.

Know Your Rights – Posted Worker 2014

In 2014, the Labour Inspectorate organised an awareness-raising campaign called ‘Know Your Rights – Posted Worker’.

The aim of the campaign was to raise awareness of the posting of workers among employees and employers. The campaign targeted employees and employers who work abroad or outsource their workforce from EU Member States to Estonia. The distinction between business trips and posted workers is difficult for both employers and employees. People turning to the Labour Inspectorate find it hard to understand which law applies to them. The terminology is confusing as well – is it a business trip or is the worker posted?

The campaign included a seminar on board the M/S Superstar, 15 information events in various Estonian cities, a press conference, a media campaign, publication of articles and a brochure entitled ‘Business Trips and Posting of Workers’.

The campaign was funded by the European Social Fund under the programme ‘Reduction of Work-related Health Risks and Improvement of Labour Relations 2010-2014’.

Know Your Rights – Choose an Employment Contract 2013

In 2013, the Labour Inspectorate organised an awareness-raising campaign called ‘Know Your Rights – Choose an Employment Contract’.

The aim of the campaign was to explain the importance and necessity of entering into an employment contract. The campaign targeted employees and employers. In the case of employees, the aim was to explain issues which may arise when working without an employment contract or working under the Law of Obligations Act, based on a contract which has the characteristics of an employment relationship. The topics included social protection, such as sickness benefits and pension, as well as the opportunity to use annual and family leave, as provided for by the employment contract. The campaign also included occupational safety, i.e. the employer’s obligation to ensure a safe and healthy working environment.

The campaign was carried out with social partners. As part of the campaign, there was a round table for journalists, a media campaign, articles and a brochure entitled ‘Choose an Employment Contract’.

The campaign was funded by the European Social Fund under the programme ‘Reduction of Work-related Health Risks and Improvement of Labour Relations 2010-2014’.

New Employees 2013

In 2013, the Labour Inspectorate organised an occupational-safety-related prevention campaign on the topic of new employees.

The aim of the campaign was to introduce or remind new employees of the rights and obligations under the employment contract and to make employers aware of how important it is to invest in the instruction and training of employees and making sure they learn safe working techniques.

More than 3300 serious occupational accidents were recorded in Estonia between 2006 and 2010. The share of occupational accidents in the first year of employment is around 30% of all recorded occupational accidents, which is more than double compared to the second year of employment. Occupational accidents in the first year of employment most often happen to young employees of up to 25 years of age. Of all serious occupational accidents involving employees aged 18-24, 60% happened in the first year of employment.

The campaign included six information events in various Estonian cities, a media campaign and a brochure entitled ‘New Employee in a Company’.

The campaign was funded by the European Social Fund under the programme ‘Reduction of Work-related Health Risks and Improvement of Labour Relations 2010-2014’.

Liability of Carriers in the Organisation of Compliance with the Working and Rest Time Requirements of Drivers 2013

In 2013, the Labour Inspectorate organised an awareness-raising campaign called ‘Liability of Carriers in the Organisation of Compliance with the Working and Rest Time Requirements of Drivers’.

The purpose of the campaign was to make transport enterprises aware of the various national and EU legislations that provide requirements for the working, driving and rest time of drivers, as well as of the liability of carriers in the case of non-compliance with the requirements, and the principles of supervision and performance of the Labour Inspectorate.

As part of the campaign, labour inspectors visited transport enterprises; there were six information events in various Estonian cities and a handbook was published on the organisation of working, driving and rest time of drivers.

The campaign was funded by the European Social Fund under the programme ‘Reduction of Work-related Health Risks and Improvement of Labour Relations 2010-2014’.

Working Together for Risk Prevention 2012-2013

In 2012-2013, the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA) and its partners from 27 Member States of the European Union and elsewhere launched a healthy workplaces campaign ‘Working Together for Risk Prevention’. The agency’s partner in Estonia was the Labour Inspectorate.

The purpose of the campaign was to facilitate cooperation between public authorities, entrepreneurs, organisations, employees and their representatives and other stakeholders for the sake of promoting occupational health and safety. The campaign focused on the following: risk prevention; risk management; encouraging senior management to actively participate in risk reduction; encouraging employees, their representatives and other stakeholders to cooperate with managers in order to reduce risks.

A variety of seminars, journalist round tables, a best practices workshop and two Health at Work Days were organised as part of the campaign. Thousands of copies of informational materials were distributed, various press releases were published and a tool for teachers was translated into Estonian in order to introduce health and safety to primary school pupils via educational and entertaining Napo video clips and creative activities. 

Working Together for Risk Prevention 2012-2013

In 2012-2013, the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA) and its partners from 27 Member States of the European Union and elsewhere launched a healthy workplaces campaign ‘Working Together for Risk Prevention’. The agency’s partner in Estonia was the Labour Inspectorate.

The purpose of the campaign was to facilitate cooperation between public authorities, entrepreneurs, organisations, employees and their representatives and other stakeholders for the sake of promoting occupational health and safety. The campaign focused on the following: risk prevention; risk management; encouraging senior management to actively participate in risk reduction; encouraging employees, their representatives and other stakeholders to cooperate with managers in order to reduce risks.

A variety of seminars, journalist round tables, a best practices workshop and two Health at Work Days were organised as part of the campaign. Thousands of copies of informational materials were distributed, various press releases were published and a tool for teachers was translated into Estonian in order to introduce health and safety to primary school pupils via educational and entertaining Napo video clips and creative activities. 

Know Your Rights – Healthy and Safe Working Conditions 2012

In 2012, the Labour Inspectorate organised an awareness-raising campaign called ‘Know Your Rights – Healthy and Safe Working Conditions’.

The purpose of the campaign was to make the working environment safer and more employee-friendly and to significantly reduce the number of occupational accidents and occupational diseases in order to save on rehabilitation costs and working time, as the number of occupational accidents in Estonia has been on an upward trend in recent years. The campaign targeted employees and employers. In the case of employees, the aim was to explain their right to a safe working environment and the importance of ensuring occupational safety in order to encourage employees to assert their rights and stand up for them. As for employers, the emphasis was on the following motto: ‘If you want your employees to work well and be productive, guarantee them good and safe working conditions!’

The allegorical question behind the campaign’s provocative slogan ‘Is Work Killing the Worker?’ was intended to call on all social partners to be aware of what can be done to ensure that work does not kill or incapacitate, but instead rewards the doer.

The campaign included a press conference and round table, a working life conference, publication of articles and ‘Is Work Killing the Worker?’ informational materials. 

The campaign was funded by the European Social Fund under the programme ‘Reduction of Work-related Health Risks and Improvement of Labour Relations 2010-2014’.

Internal Audit – Managing the Working Environment in a Company 2012

In 2012, the Labour Inspectorate organised an occupational-safety-related prevention campaign on the topic of internal audit.

The purpose of the campaign was to influence employers to think more about the activities they could do if their work was organised better. The campaign primarily targeted enterprises in manufacturing, construction and service (trade, catering), as the Labour Inspectorate considered cooperation between employer representatives and employees the weakest in these sectors.

Most of the problems with employers are related to the formation and implementation of the enterprise’s working environment structures (working environment specialist, working environment representative, working environment council) and internal audit. The movement of information about problems related to the working environment from employees to employers and vice versa is worse. Workspaces are dispersed and, in the case of construction, the places of work are temporary.

The campaign included visits by labour inspectors to manufacturing, construction and service enterprises, four information events in various Estonian cities, a media campaign and a brochure on managing occupational health and safety.

The campaign was funded by the European Social Fund under the programme ‘Reduction of Work-related Health Risks and Improvement of Labour Relations 2010-2014’.

Work-related stress – Psychosocial Risk Factors 2012

In 2012, the Senior Labour Inspectors Committee (SLIC) organised with the Member States of the European Union an inspection campaign on the topic of psychosocial risk factors. A Swedish-led working group consisting of the representatives of 12 Member States was formed in order to prepare and coordinate the campaign.

The campaign was focused on the healthcare, service (e.g. hotels and restaurants) and transport sectors. In Estonia, the campaign targeted the healthcare sector, including public social care institutions, focusing in particular on nurses and carers.

Hospital work is characterised, among other things, by the accumulation of many demanding tasks, many administrative tasks and many distractions in the performance of demanding tasks (e.g. ringing telephones, colleagues asking for help). There may be conflicting expectations and disagreements in terms of what is provided to patients and what their relatives expect. There is extensive cooperation between hospital departments and employees deal with patients with various diagnoses. High flow of patients, high bed occupancy, constant need for basic nursing care, many urgent tasks, frequent busy periods and the demand for attention and focus during other activities may place increased demands on employees.

As part of the campaign, the Labour Inspectorate organised four information events in 2012 in the largest hospitals in Estonia, attended by nurses and caregivers from healthcare and care facilities. The purpose of the information events was to raise awareness of psychosocial issues related to hospital work as well as their preventive, mitigating and remedial measures, which are taken into account in the case of stressful work.

After the information events, labour inspectors visited healthcare institutions (including social care), conducting targeted inspections to monitor the enterprises regarding the occurrence of psychosocial risk factors and their prevention and mitigation.

Personal Data in Employment Relationships and Rules for the Organisation of Work 2012

In 2012, the Labour Inspectorate and the Data Protection Inspectorate organised a campaign to raise awareness of personal data in employment relationships and rules for the organisation of work.

The purpose of the campaign was to raise public awareness of issues related to the processing of personal data.

It is in the interest of employers to process the personal data of employees without major restrictions, while employees have a justified desire to maintain privacy in their employment relationship. Processing the personal data of employees, including sensitive personal data, is a delicate topic, sometimes even involving the processing of data for which the employer has no legitimate interest. At the same time, the law allows the possibility to process the personal data of employees in the case of legitimate interest. Where is the line? While, in certain cases, it is permitted to process personal data without the employee’s consent, it is required in order to process sensitive data. What should employers do, in order not to violate the privacy of employees, yet at the same time obtain the information necessary for the performance of the employment contract?

The campaign included four information events in various Estonian cities, a media campaign and a brochure on personal data in employment relationships and rules for the organisation of work.

The campaign was funded by the European Social Fund under the programme ‘Reduction of Work-related Health Risks and Improvement of Labour Relations 2010-2014’.

Financial Claims in Employment Relationships 2012

In 2012, the Labour Inspectorate launched a campaign to raise awareness of financial claims in employment relationships.

The purpose of the campaign was to raise the awareness of contracting parties regarding the nature of financial obligations, the consequences of failing to fulfil these obligations and their possibilities in the event of claims arising and realising.

Financial claims may arise both at the beginning of and during the employment relationship, and last until the termination of the employment contract. One of the primary obligations of employers is to pay employees the agreed remuneration for their work. Employers have other financial obligations in addition to remuneration, such as holiday pay, compensation, sickness benefit and final settlement. The most frequent financial obligation of employees is related to causing material damage. It is easier to fulfil your obligations than to file a claim against the other party later.

The campaign included eight information events in various Estonian cities with the chairmen of labour dispute committees, a media campaign and a brochure on financial claims in employment relationships.

The campaign was funded by the European Social Fund under the programme ‘Reduction of Work-related Health Risks and Improvement of Labour Relations 2010-2014’.

Personal Protective Equipment 2011

In 2011, the Labour Inspectorate organised a prevention campaign on the topic of personal protective equipment.

The campaign focused on the use of PPE at work, with the aim of stressing the importance of their use and introducing the consequences of not using them.

Failure to use PPE is one of the most common violations in the manufacturing and construction sector. The 2009 working environment overview of the Labour Inspectorate shows that occupational accidents related to failure to use PPE account for nearly half of all occupational accidents.

The campaign included visits by labour inspectors to manufacturing and construction enterprises to check on the use of PPE, four information events and a media campaign.

The campaign was funded by the European Social Fund under the programme ‘Reduction of Work-related Health Risks and Improvement of Labour Relations 2010-2014’.

Termination of Employment 2011

In 2011, the Labour Inspectorate launched a campaign to raise awareness of the termination of employment.

The purpose of the campaign was to inform employers and employees of their rights and obligations in regard to the termination of employment contracts in order to avoid conflicts and reduce the number of labour disputes.

Termination of employment relationships is one of the most complex areas of employment. Although the possibilities of terminating an employment contract have remained the same compared to previous acts, the contracting parties have to consider several new principles, especially when terminating an employment contract. Several amendments have been made in the rules for disputes related to the termination of employment.

The campaign included 13 information events in various Estonian cities, a media campaign and a brochure on the termination of employment contracts.

The campaign was funded by the European Social Fund under the programme ‘Reduction of Work-related Health Risks and Improvement of Labour Relations 2010-2014’.

Working and Rest Time of Drivers 2011

In 2011, the Labour Inspectorate launched a campaign to raise awareness of the working and rest time of drivers.

The aim of the campaign was to introduce working and rest time provisions in the context of the new Traffic Act, which entered into force on 1 January 2011. The topic was especially important because the Traffic Act, which entered into force in 2011, entailed a variety of significant changes for drivers. The campaign was targeted at transport enterprises.

In the course of the campaign, four information events took place in various Estonian cities.

The campaign was funded by the European Social Fund under the programme ‘Reduction of Work-related Health Risks and Improvement of Labour Relations 2010-2014’.

Risk Assessment for the Use of Dangerous Substances 2010-2011

In 2010-2011, the Senior Labour Inspectors Committee (SLIC) and its partners from 26 Member States of the European Union and Norway organised a communication, awareness-raising and inspection campaign ‘Risk Assessment for the Use of Dangerous Substances at Work’. In Estonia, the campaign was carried out by the Labour Inspectorate.

The purpose of the campaign was to raise awareness of assessing the risks of various chemicals. Many areas of activity use chemicals in their working environment and issues are frequent in fields where they are used to manufacture other products or to provide services.

The campaign targeted micro and small enterprises in the industrial treatment of wood, the furniture industry, vehicle repair, bakeries, dry cleaning and industrial cleaning who use various chemicals on a daily basis.

The campaign included visits by labour inspectors to baking, wood and furniture, vehicle repair as well as dry and chemical cleaning enterprises, 14 information events in various Estonian cities and a brochure on dangerous chemicals in the working environment.

The campaign was funded by the European Social Fund under the programme ‘Reduction of Work-related Health Risks and Improvement of Labour Relations 2010-2014’.

Work-related Stress 2010

In 2010, the Labour Inspectorate organised a prevention campaign on the topic of work-related stress.

The purpose of the campaign was to raise public awareness and reduce the health impact of work-related stress. Estonian enterprises pay little attention to psychosocial risks when they assess various risks in the working environment, as they are difficult to assess and not much is known about their occurrence and health impact.

As part of the campaign, social partners were provided general information on the causes and health impact of work-related stress, an online tool, Stressivastu.ee was created to assess the level of psychosocial factors of an enterprise and information was provided on managing these factors.

The campaign was funded by the European Social Fund under the programme ‘Reduction of Work-related Health Risks and Improvement of Labour Relations 2010-2014’.

Working and Rest Time 2010

In 2010, the Labour Inspectorate launched a campaign to raise awareness of working and rest time.

The campaign focused on issues related to working and rest time. Compliance with the requirements of working and rest time is important from the perspective of employee health. Employers and employees often do not pay enough attention to compliance with working and rest time. Employees are often willing to work longer shifts and do overtime for the sake of a higher income. The awareness of employees of legislation governing working and rest time is lacking, which makes it possible to assign them longer shifts without receiving the compensation prescribed by law. The campaign targeted employees and employers.

The campaign included 13 information events in various Estonian cities, a media campaign and a brochure on working and rest time.

The campaign was funded by the European Social Fund under the programme ‘Reduction of Work-related Health Risks and Improvement of Labour Relations 2010-2014’.

Slipping and Tripping – Preventing Accidents 2009

In 2009, the Labour Inspectorate organised a campaign called ‘Slipping and Tripping – Preventing Accidents’.

The campaign focused on preventing falls resulting from slipping and tripping. These are the most common causes of occupational accidents, accounting for nearly a quarter (24.6%) of all occupational accidents and have often been assessed by doctors as serious occupational accidents. Such falls occur in enterprises of various fields of activity and are frequent even in fields that are otherwise low-risk. The campaign targeted enterprises in the fields of activity which had experienced occupational accidents for similar reasons.

The campaign included a targeted inspection of 200 enterprises, five information events in various Estonian cities, distribution of informational materials and a brochure on slipping and tripping along with ways to prevent accidents.

The campaign was funded by the European Social Fund under the programme ‘Reduction of Work-related Health Risks and Improvement of Labour Relations 2009’.

Instruction and Training of Employees at Work 2009

In 2009, the Labour Inspectorate launched a campaign to raise awareness of the instruction and training of employees at work.

The campaign focused on employee instruction and training. During supervision and investigation of occupational accidents, inspectors often come across situations where employees have received formal instruction and given a signature to prove it, but are not actually familiar with the risks associated with their work. The campaign explained the importance of instruction and training in ensuring the safety of employees as well as its organisation in enterprises. The campaign targeted employees and employers.

The campaign included visits by labour inspectors to enterprises, seven information events in various Estonian cities, distribution of informational materials and a brochure on employee instruction and training.

The campaign was funded by the European Social Fund under the programme ‘Reduction of Work-related Health Risks and Improvement of Labour Relations 2009’.

Employment Contracts Act 2009

In 2009, the Labour Inspectorate launched a campaign to raise awareness of the Employment Contracts Act.

The campaign focused on the new Employment Contracts Act, which entered into force on 1 July 2009, explaining the issues related to the implementation of the act and changes in the supervisory activities of the Labour Inspectorate. The campaign targeted employees and employers.

The campaign included 42 information events in various Estonian cities and distribution of informational materials.

The campaign was funded by the European Social Fund under the programme ‘Reduction of Work-related Health Risks and Improvement of Labour Relations 2009’.

Manual Handling of Loads 2008

In 2008, the Labour Inspectorate organised an inspection campaign on the topic of manual handling of loads.

The campaign focused on enterprises in construction and trade. During inspections, inspectors assessed whether manual handling of loads was present in the risk assessment, how it corresponded to the actual situation, and the action plan for risk reduction. Employee instruction and training, the availability and use of assistive work equipment, working conditions, the organisation of work and medical examinations of employees were also assessed.

In the course of the campaign, inspectors visited 110 trade enterprises and 110 construction sites. 

Biological Risk Factors 2008

In 2008, the Labour Inspectorate organised an inspection campaign on the topic of biological risk factors.

The campaign focused on healthcare institutions, agricultural holdings, sewage and waste handlers, slaughterhouses, veterinary and diagnostic laboratories and cleaning enterprises. In regard to biological risk factors, the most problematic fields are waste handling and agriculture, with healthcare not far behind, as it is a field with the highest number of employees exposed to biological risk factors. Veterinary and diagnostic laboratories, where awareness of biological risk factors is less problematic than in other fields, are in a fairly good condition.

In the course of the campaign, inspectors visited 134 enterprises. 

Lighten the Load 2007

In 2007, with the help of the Senior Labour Inspectors Committee (SLIC), the Labour Inspectorate organised an information and inspection campaign in order to prevent employees’ lower-back issues in the transport and healthcare sector.

The ‘Lighten the Load’ campaign on the topic of manual handling of loads was intended to provide a better understanding of employees’ health issues and ailments and to implement measures to prevent lower back and other musculoskeletal issues by reducing manual handling of loads.

The campaign was carried out in all EU Member States, with labour inspectors visiting enterprises to check on whether they comply with the requirements for better back health and how people manage the manual handling of loads at work.

As part of the campaign, informational materials provided by SLIC were translated (a brochure introducing the campaign and brochures regarding the manual handling of loads in the transport and medical sector). The kick-off event of the campaign took place on 24 April in the 5th floor hall of the Ministry of Social Affairs, attended by representatives of various social partners in the healthcare and transport sector (central organisations of trade unions and employers, health protection and occupational health services, medical institutions, etc.), sub-unions of employers and trade unions and other institutions.

As part of the campaign, the Labour Inspectorate carried out supervision in trade and health care enterprises.

Lighten the Load 2007

In 2007, the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work organised a Europe-wide ‘Lighten the Load’ campaign focusing on musculoskeletal disorders, which included all EU Member States and EFTA states.

The campaign continued the events held in the year 2000 as part of the first European Week ‘Turn Your Back on Musculoskeletal Disorders’, targeting musculoskeletal issues. 

Musculoskeletal disorders affecting muscles, joints, tendons and nerves are the leading cause of being absent from work in virtually all EU Member States.

The campaign aimed to promote a comprehensive approach to this issue, emphasising that employers, employees and governments should combat musculoskeletal disorders together. The campaign highlighted the principle of lightening the load, not only taking into account the difficulty of the work, but also the stress caused by environmental factors and the pace of work. The importance of keeping those who are suffering or have suffered from musculoskeletal disorders employed, rehabilitating them and bringing them back to work was also stressed.

Safe Start – Young Workers 2006

In 2006, the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work organised the ‘Safe Start’ campaign, which included all EU Member States, candidate states, the European Free Trade Association states, the European Parliament, the European Commission and European social partners.

The campaign was dedicated to the occupational health and safety of youth. There are several reasons why occupational accidents involve younger workers more than older workers, including lack of training, experience and awareness of occupational health and safety, as well as the physical and mental immaturity of youth and the type of work and situation they are placed in. However, many accidents and health issues affecting the youth are preventable. Young workers are receptive to information regarding occupational health and safety and protect themselves if they are aware of potential risks.

The campaign raised awareness of risks among young workers and employers, both in enterprises and schools, attempting to reach the youth early and inure them to risk prevention.

The campaign culminated in October 2006 with the European Week for Safety and Health at Work and the final event of the campaign took place in March 2007 in Bilbao.

Minimising Asbestos Risks at Work 2006

In 2006, the Senior Labour Inspectors Committee (SLIC) of the European Commission organised an inspection campaign for the protection of employee health in all EU Member States where maintenance and demolition work is carried out, which may include exposure to asbestos, and where materials containing asbestos are removed. Inspection visits are carried out by national labour inspectorates (if necessary, by occupational health institutions).

The purpose of the campaign was to monitor the implementation of Directive 2003/18/EC, with which the legislation of all Member States had to comply with by 15 April 2006 at the latest.

Building in Safety 2005

In 2005, a campaign for construction safety was organised in Estonia by the Senior Labour Inspectors Committee (SLIC) of the European Commission and the European Commission.

Due to its nature, construction has been and continues to be the most dangerous field of activity. However, it is possible to reduce the number of accidents in construction, and we must do so. Estonia has integrated into its legislation all European Union directives regarding construction safety, but they have not yet reached all employers and employees. The campaign launched by the SLIC and the European Commission was carried out in 2004 in the so-called old Member States and in 2005 in the new Member States.

Stop That Noise! 2005

The ‘Stop That Noise!’ campaign was launched in 25 EU Member states, EFTA states and candidate states in 2005.

As part of the campaign, a summit attended by EU policy-makers, social partners and leading occupational health and safety specialists was held in Bilbao on 12 December. The new EU noise directive was highlighted during the meeting and awards were presented for the implementation of the best noise prevention measures in Europe.

The 2005 European Good Practice Awards were given to the best practical solutions intended to avoid exposure to noise. The winners included new low-noise methods for concrete processing implemented in Germany and France, a Swedish nightclub design project, Danish protective equipment for farmers, the Dutch example of calculating the most cost-effective anti-noise solution and the UK training project for bandsmen.

Last updated: 14.02.2024